Posted by Asha Taraiya

Now that you are familiar with the Diamond 4Cs and the popular Diamond Shapes, let us understand the various Diamond Settings which will help you choose the right one for your jewellery. Diamond settings not only influence the functionality of your jewellery but also its aesthetics.

Prong Setting

In this setting, the diamond is held in its place with the help of prong-like little metal claws. Prongs can be rounded, pointed, flat, or V-shaped. The prong setting exposes more of the diamond to light, thus adding to its brilliance.

One drawback of this setting is that if the prongs are sharp, they can snag on clothing or other material. To avoid this, you can opt for blunt prongs (rounded) or lower-set prong settings.

 

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Bezel Setting

In this setting, the diamond is encircled by a thin metal rim which holds the stone tightly in place. Bezel settings can be partial, where only part of the diamond is encircled or full, where the complete stone is encircled. This setting is apt for people with active lifestyles.

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Tension Setting

In this setting, the diamond is held in place by the tension in the metal band so as to make the diamond look as if it is suspended between the two sides of the band.

However, to make the stone more secure yet retain the look of the tension setting, it is advisable to use the tension-style setting. In this an additional layer of security is added by using a prong or bezel setting on the side or underneath the diamond to hold the diamond firmly in place.

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Channel Setting

In this setting, small diamonds are set closely together into the grooves of the channel making the shank (band of the ring or the part that encircles your finger) sparkle. It is a very secure and snag-free setting.

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Bar Setting

In this setting, diamonds are held in place between vertical metal bars. It is similar to channel settings, but the difference is that channel settings enclose the diamond on all sides whereas the bar setting leaves the diamond exposed on two sides.

 

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Pavé Setting

Also known as bead setting, in this small diamonds are held together with minimal visibility of the tiny metal beads or prongs holding the stones in place, thus giving the effect of a continuous sparkle (or paved with diamonds).

Pavé settings makes the centre stone pop and is a good way to add extra sparkle to a lower-set or less sparkly centre stone. However, if the ring is pavé set around the entire band, ring sizing can be very difficult.

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Halo Setting

In this setting, small diamonds are placed in concentric circle (or square) around a centre stone. The halo setting can make the centre stone appear larger and more sparkly.

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Cluster Setting

As the name suggests, in this setting small diamonds cluster together and appear like a large diamond. The cluster can either contain a large centre stone or cluster together stones of equal size.

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Flush Setting

Also known as Gypsy Setting, in this the diamond is set into a drilled hole in the band of the ring so that the ring sits “flush” with the band of the ring. This setting is also very secure and prevents the stone from chipping or falling out.

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Split-Shank

A ring in which the shank (band of the ring) splits into two separate shanks is called a split-shank ring.

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These were the 10 most popular diamond settings. So which one is your favorite?

If you are still confused as to which diamond to choose for your engagement ring, contact our diamond expert via Live Chat or call us on 91 – 99011 91464 today!